Reproduced here with minor edits is the complete text of the bibliography that accompanies Reading Adrienne Rich: Reviews and Re-Visions 1951-81, edited by Jane Roberta Cooper, University of Michigan Press, © 1984. Cooper’s thirty-five page bibliography covered work published from 1951 to 1983, excluding juvenilia, poems published in magazines, and books by Rich published in the UK or in translation.
The present bibliography incorporates books, reviews, and articles published after 1983. Nevertheless, updating Cooper’s work is an ongoing progress and this list is by no means complete. Useful bibliographies can also be found in the books listed in Secondary Sources. More recently, valuable appreciations of Rich and commentary on her work have appeared on-line but are not currently represented here.

For prose, poetry and collections available in print, see books 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. PRIMARY MATERIALS

Books by Adrienne Rich   (1951-2016)
Articles by Adrienne Rich   (1963-2009)

II. SECONDARY MATERIALS
Chapters and Articles in Books, Pamphlets
Articles in Serials
Reviews, Announcements of Publications and Awards
Interviews


 

I. PRIMARY MATERIALS

Books by Adrienne Rich (1951-2016)

A Change of World (Yale University Press, 1951; W.W. Norton, 2016)
The Diamond Cutters and Other Poems (Harper, 1955)
Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law: Poems 1954-1962 (Harper, 1963; W.W. Norton, 1967) Necessities of Life (W.W. Norton, 1966)
Leaflets: Poems 1965-1968 (W.W. Norton, 1969)
The Will to Change: Poems 1968-1970 (W.W. Norton, 1971)
Diving into the Wreck: Poems 1971-1972 (W.W. Norton, 1973)
Poems: Selected and New, 1950-1974 (W.W. Norton, 1975)
Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution (W.W. Norton, 1976, 1996)
Twenty-one Love Poems (Effie’s Press, 1976)
The Dream of a Common Language: Poems 1974-1977 (W.W. Norton, 1978)
On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose, 1966-1978 (W.W. Norton, 1979)
A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far: Poems 1978-1981 (W.W. Norton, 1981)
Sources (Heyeck Press, 1983)
The Fact of a Doorframe: Selected Poems (W.W. Norton, 1985, 2001)
Your Native Land, Your Life: Poems (W.W. Norton, 1986)
Blood, Bread, and Poetry: Selected Prose 1979-1985 (W.W. Norton, 1986)
Time’s Power: Poems 1985-1988 (W.W. Norton, 1989)
An Atlas of the Difficult World: Poems 1988-1991 (W.W. Norton, 1991)
Collected Early Poems 1950-1970 (W.W. Norton, 1993)
What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics (W.W. Norton, 1993, 2001)
Dark Fields of the Republic: Poems 1991-1995 (W.W. Norton, 1995)
Midnight Salvage: Poems 1995-1998 (W.W. Norton, 1999)
Arts of the Possible: Essays and Conversations (W.W. Norton, 2001)
Fox: Poems 1998-2000 (W.W. Norton, 2001)
The School Among the Ruins: Poems 2000-2004 (W.W. Norton, 2004)
Telephone Ringing in the Labyrinth: Poems 2004-2006 (W.W. Norton, 2007)
Poetry & Commitment: An Essay (W.W. Norton, 2007)
A Human Eye: Essays on Art and Society, 1997-2008 (W.W. Norton, 2009)
Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems 2007-2010 (W.W. Norton, 2011)
Later Poems: Selected and New: 1971-2012 (W.W. Norton, 2012)
Collected Poems 1951-2012 (W.W. Norton, 2016)

Articles by Adrienne Rich (1963-1983)

1963
Review of The Lordly Hudson: Collected Poems of Paul Goodman. New York Review of Books, first issue, undated, 1963, p. 27.

1964
“Beyond the Heirlooms of Tradition.” Review of Found Objects by Louis Zukofsky. Poetry 105 (November 1964): 128-29.
“Mr. Bones, He Lives.” Review of 77 Dream Songs by John Berryman. The Nation, May 25, 1964, pp. 538, 540.
“On Karl Shapiro’s The Bourgeois Poet.” ln The Contemporary Poet as Artist and Critic: 8 Symposia, edited by Anthony Ostroff. Little, Brown, 1964, pp. 192-94.
“Poetry and Experience: Statement at a Poetry Reading, 1964.” Quoted in “Adrienne Rich: The Poetics of Change,” by Albert Gelpi. In American Poetry Since 1960, edited by Robert Shaw. Cheadle, Cheshire: Carcanet Press, 1973, pp. 132-33. Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (Norton Critical Edition), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W.W. Norton, 1975, p. 89.

1965
“Reflections on Lawrence.” Review of The Complete Poems of D. H. Lawrence, edited by Vivian De Sola Pinto and F. Warren Roberts. Poetry 106 (June 1965): 218-25.

1966
“Six Anthologies.” Review. Poetry 108 (August 1966): 343-45.

1967
“For Randall Jarrell.” in Randall Jarrell 1914-1965, edited by Robert Lowell, Peter Taylor, and Robert Penn Warren. Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1967, pp.182-83.
“The Tensions of Anne Bradstreet.” In The Works of Anne Bradstreet, edited by Jeanine Hensley. Harvard University Press, 1967. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978. W.W. Norton, 1979.

1968-69
“Ghalib: ‘The Dew Drop on the Red Poppy. . . .”Mahfil 5 (1968-69): 59-69. Rich’s translations of the Urdu poet Ghalib.

1969
“Living with Henry.” Review of His Toy, His Dream, His Rest by John Berryman. Harvard Advocate (John Berryman issue), 103 (Spring 1969):10-11.

1970
“Jean Valentine: Pilgrims.” Review. Chicago Review 22 (Autumn 1970):128-30.

1971
Adrienne Rich to Aijaz Ahmad. Quoted in Ghazals of Ghalib: Versions From the Urdu by Aijaz Ahmad, W. S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, William Stafford, David Ray, Thomas Fitzsimmons, Mark Strand, and William Hunt, edited by Aijaz Ahmad. Columbia University Press. 1971. pp. xxv-xxvi. Rich comments on her fascination with the ghazal form.
Introduction to “(Reflections) of a Convict, Poems From Prison,” by Luis Talamantez. Liberation 16 (November 1971): 10.
“A Tool or a Weapon. “ Review of For You and The Clay Hill Anthology by Hayden Carruth. The Nation October 25, 1971: 408-10.
“When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision.” Paper presented at the Modern Language Association Commission on the Status of Women in the Profession forum on “The Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century,” 1971. Published in College English 34 (October 1972):18-30. Reprinted in The Norton Reader, edited by Arthur M. Eastman, et al. 3d ed. W. W. Norton, 1973, p. 104. Revised [updated] and reprinted in American Poets in 1976, edited by William Heyen. Bobbs-Merrill, 1976, pp. 276-92. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence, 1979 and in Arts of the Possible: Essays and Conversations, W.W. Norton, 1979.

1972
“The Anti-Feminist Woman.” Review of The New Chastity, and Other Arguments Against Women’s Liberation by Midge Decter. New York Review of Books, November 3, 1972, pp. 34-40. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“The Case for a Drop-Out School.” New York Review of Books, June 15, 1972, pp. 33 3. Reprinted in Starting Your Own High School. The Elizabeth Cleaners Street School People. Random House, Vintage Books, 1972.
“Poetry, Personality, and Wholeness: A Response to Galway Kinnell.” FIELD: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, no. 7 (Fall 1972): 11-18. Kinnell’s “Poetry, Personality, and Death” appeared in FIELD, no. 4 (Spring 1971): 56-75. Both his essay and Rich’s are reprinted in A Field Guide to Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, edited by Stuart Friebert and David Young. Longman, 1980, pp. 203-32.
Review of Welcome, Eumenides by Eleanor Ross Taylor. New York Times Book Review, July 2, 1972, p.3. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Review of Women and Madness by Phyllis Chesler. New York Times Book Review, December 31, 1972, p. 1.
“Teaching Language in Open Admissions.” ln The Uses of Literature, edited by Monroe Engel. Harvard University Press, 1973, pp. 257-73. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Voices in the Wilderness.” Review of Monster by Robin Morgan. Washington Post Book World, December 31, 1972, p. 3.

1973
“Caryatid: A Column.” American Poetry Review 2 (January/February 1973); (May/June 1973); (September/October 1973). The first two essays, “Vietnam and Sexual Violence” and “Natalya Gorbanevskaya,” are reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Jane Eyre: The Teachings of a Motherless Woman.” Ms. 2 (October 1973):68. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence, pp. 89-106. An earlier version of the essay was presented as a lecture at Brandeis University in 1972.
Review of The Women Poets in English: An Anthology, edited by Ann Stanford. New York Times Book Review, April 15, 1973, P. 6.
“The Sisterhood of Man.” Review of Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women’s Liberation by Mary Daly. Washington Post Book World, November 11, 1973, pp. 2-3.

1974
“Anne Sexton: 1928-1974.” Memorial presentation at City College of New York, 1974. In On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Dedication to Self-Determination.” off our backs 4 (June 1974): 20.
“New Women’s Poetry.” Letter to the Editor. New York Times Magazine, December 24, 1974, p. 38.
Written in response to M. L. Rosenthal’s “Like the Shark, It Contains a Shoe: The Aroused Language of Modern Poetry.” New York Times Magazine, November 24, 1974, p. 13. (See also Rosenthal’s response to Rich’s letter in December 24 issue.)
“The Origins of Feminist Myth-Making.” Review of The First Sex and tribute to Elizabeth Gould Davis. Boston Phoenix, September 10, 1974, p. 15.
“Women’s Studies—Renaissance or Revolution?” Paper read at the University of Pennsylvania Women’s Studies Conference, November 14, 1974. Published in Women’s Studies 3:2 (1976): 121-26.

1975
“Feminism and Fascism: An Exchange [with Susan Sontag].” New York Review of Books, March 20, 1975, pp. 31-32. Response to Sontag’s “Fascinating Fascism,” a piece on Leni Reifenstahl, in the New York Review of Books, February 6, 1975.
Introduction to Voices: A Play for Women by Susan Griffin. Brooklyn, New York: The Feminist Press, 1975.
Prefatory note to Amazon Poetry: An Anthology, edited by Elly Bulkin and Joan Larkin. Out & Out Books, 1975.
“The Theft of Childbirth.” Reviews of Immaculate Deception: A New Look at Childbirth in America by Suzanne Arms and Birth Without Violence by Frederick Leboyer. New York Review of Books, October 2, 1975, pp. 25-30.
“Toward a Woman-Centered University.” In Women and the Power to Change, edited by Florence Howe. McGraw-Hill, 1975, pp. 15-46. Excerpts reprinted in the Chronicle of Higher Education 10 (July 26, 1975): 32. Complete essay reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Vesuvius at Home: The Power of Emily Dickinson.” Earliest version presented at Brandeis University; revised version presented as the Lucy Donelley Martin lecture at Bryn Mawr College; published in Parnassus: Poetry in Review 15 (Fall/Winter 1976):49-74. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Women and Honor: Some Notes on Lying.” Presented at the Hartwick College Women Writers’Workshop in Oneonta, New York, in June 1975; first published in Pittsburgh by Motheroot Publications as a pamphlet in 1977. Reprinted in Heresies: A Feminist Journal of Art and Politics I (1977); in French translation by Les Editions du Remue-Menage, 1979; and in On Lies, Secrets and Silence, and in Arts of the Possible: Essays and Conversations, 2009.
“Writers’ Choice.” Reviews of Maps and Windows by Jane Cooper, Ordinary Things by Jean Valentine, and Through the Flower: My Struggle As A Woman Artist by Judy Chicago. Partisan Review 42 (1975): 155-56.

1976
“A Challenge to All Your Ideas About Motherhood and Daughterhood: From Adrienne Rich’s Extraordinary Book.” Ms. 5 (October 1976): 60.
Excerpts from “Motherhood and Daughterhood,” chapter 9 of Of Woman Born. See responses by Carol Fulkerson and Mary Helen Washington and Rich’s reply to Washington in Letters to the Editor, Ms. 5 (February 1977):4, 6-7. For annotation see Mary Helen Washington below, in Secondary Materials.
“Anger and Tenderness.” The Second Wave: A Magazine of the New Feminism 4 (Spring 1976): 3-11. With some revisions, this essay appears as the first chapter of Of Woman Born.
“Conditions for Work: The Common World of Women.” Foreword to Working It Out: 23 Women Writers, Artists, Scientists, and Scholars Talk About Their Lives and Work, edited by Sara Ruddick and Pamela Daniels. Pantheon Books, 1977. Reprinted in Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics. Lesbian Art and Artists issue I (Fall 1977), and in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Foreword to The Other Voices: 20th Century Women’s Poetry in Translation, edited by Joanna Bankier, et al., W. W. Norton, 1976.
“It Is the Lesbian in Us. . . .” Presented at a Modern Language Association panel sponsored by the Women’s Commission and the Gay Caucus, December 26, 1976. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“The Kingdom of the Fathers.” Partisan Review 43 (1976):17-37. With some revisions, this essay appears as the third chapter of Of Woman Born.
“Mother and Son, Woman and Man.” American Poetry Review 5 (September/October 1976):6-13. This essay is the eighth chapter of Of Woman Born.
“Motherhood in Bondage.” New York Times “Op-Ed” page, November 20, 1976. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution. W. W. Norton, 1976; pb. ed. Bantam, 1977.
Response to Jan Clausen’s questionnaire, “Publishing as a Political Act. ” In Clausen, “The Politics of Publishing and the Lesbian Community.” Sinister Wisdom I (Fall 1976): 95-115.

1977
“Claiming an Education.” Presented at Douglass College Convocation, September 6, 1977. Published in The Common Woman (New Brunswick, New Jersey), n.d. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Foreword to The Lesbian: A Celebration of Difference by Bernice Goodman. Out & Out Books, 1977.
Introduction to Ordinary Women/Mujeres Comunes: An Anthology by New York City Women, edited by Sara Miles, Patricia Jones, Sandra Maria Esteves, and Fay Chiang. New York: Ordinary Women Books, 1978.
“Husband-Right and Father-Right.” Introduction to Legal Kidnapping by Anna Demeter. Boston: Beacon Press, 1977. Reprinted in Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture, no. 5 (1978):105-8, and in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Letter to the Editor. Ms. 5 (February 1977):7. Reply to Mary Helen Washington’s letter about the excerpt from Of Woman Born published in Ms. in October 1976, “A Challenge to All Your Ideas about Motherhood and Daughterhood.”
“The Meaning of Our Love for Women Is What We Have Constantly to Expand.” Presented at the women’s rally during Gay Pride demonstration in Central Park, 1977; published as a pamphlet in Brooklyn, New York by Out & Out Books in 1977. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Power and Danger: Works of a Common Woman.” Introduction to The Work of a Common Woman: The Collected Poetry of Judy Grahn. Oakland, California: Diana Press, 1978; New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1978. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence, pp. 247-58.
Review of The Female Experience: An American Documentary by Gerda Lerner. New York Times Book Review, March 20, 1977, p. 5.
“There Is a Fly in This House.” Review of Housework by Joan Larkin. Ms. 5 (February 1977): 46.
“The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action.” Presented at the Lesbians and Literature panel of the Modern Language Association convention, Chicago, in December, 1977, and for the Turning Point Project at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, in 1978. Published in Sinister Wisdom, no. 6 (Summer 1978): 17-25.

1978
“Disloyal to Civilization: Feminism, Racism, Gynephobia.” Partially presented at the MLA panel “The Transformation of Silence. . .” and partially presented for the Turning Point Project (see entry above). Complete version in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
“Motherhood: The Contemporary Emergency and the Quantum Leap.” Presented at the Women’s Resource and Policy Development Center Conference on The Future of Mothering, Columbus, Ohio, in June, 1978. Published in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.
Personal communication with Mary Daly, January 1978. Quoted by Mary Daly, in Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism. Beacon Press, 1978, pp. 322-23n.
Rich’s statement on conflict between desire to learn more about the condition of women and horror at the discovery of materials on pornography, female child abuse, and female sexual enslavement.

Review of Woman and Nature by Susan Griffin. New Women’s Times Feminist Review, November 1978, p. 5.
“Taking Women Students Seriously.” Presented to the New Jersey College and University Coalition on Women’s Education, May 9, 1978; published in Radical Teacher: a news journal of socialist theory and practice, no. 11 (March 1979): 40-43. Reprinted in On Lies, Secrets and Silence.

1979
“Commencement Address to Smith College Class of 1979.” Smith Alumnae Quarterly 70 (August 1979):8-10. Excerpts published in “Adrienne Rich on Privilege, Power, and Tokenism.” Ms. 8 (September 1979): 42-44. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry: Selected Prose 1979-1985, W.W. Norton, 1986.
“In Support of Mary Daly.” Letter to the Editor. New Women’s Times, April 27-May 10, 1979, p. 8.
On Lies, Secrets and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978. W. W. Norton, 1979.
“The Problem with Lorraine Hansberry.” Freedomways: A Quarterly Review of the Freedom Movement 19 (1979): 247-55. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
Review of Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism by Mary Daly. New York Times Book Review, February 14, 1979, p. 10.

1980
Afterword to Take Back the Night: Women on Pornography, edited by Laura Lederer. William Morrow, 1980, pp. 313-30.
“Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 5 (Summer 1980): 631-60. Reprinted as a pamphlet in 1981 by Onlywomen Press, London; and in 1982 by Antelope Publications, Denver Co. Reprinted, with a new foreword, in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986. For three women’s responses to this essay, see “Viewpoint: On ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’: Defining the Issues. Signs 7 (Autumn 1981). Articles by Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Ann Ferguson, and Jacquelyn N. Zita; the “Viewpoint,” and a separate comment by Martha E. Thompson, are all cited below in the Articles in Serials section.
Commencement Speech for Smith College Graduate School of Social Work, August 13, 1980. Smith School for Social Work Journal, Fall 1980.
Foreword to The Coming Out Stories, edited by Julia Penelope Stanley and Susan J. Wolfe. Watertown, Massachusetts: Persephone Press, 1980.
For commentary on Rich’s foreword, see Marguerite Fenton, review of The Coming Out Stories. The Second Wave: A Magazine of the New Feminism 5 (Summer 1980):47-48; Jane Gurko, “Coming out, coming in, coming home,” in New Women’s Times Feminist Review, no. 13 (December 1980 (January 1981): 18-20.
“Response.” Letter to the Editors. Sinister Wisdom, no. 14 (Summer 1980): 104-5. Rich comments on Elly Bulkin’s article in Sinister Wisdom, no. 13, about white feminism and racism in Mary Daly’s Gyn/Ecology and in the lesbian/feminist press.
“‘Wholeness Is No Trifling Matter’: Some Fiction by Black Women.” New Women’s Times Feminist Review, no. 13 (December 1980-January 1981): 10-13; no. 14 (February/March 1981):12. See response by Holly Brough, “Naming Names.” Letter to the Editors, New Women’s Times Feminist Review, no. 15 (April/May 1981): 2.

1981
“Disobedience and Women’s Studies”. Keynote address for the National Women’s Studies Association Convention Storrs, Connecticut, 1981. The theme of the convention was “Women Respond to Racism.” See also Audre Lorde, “The Uses of Anger,” in Sister Outsider, Trumansburg, NY: Crossing Press, 1984. Both keynote addresses were first published in Women’s Studies Quarterly 9, no. 3, Fall 1981. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“An Interview with Audre Lorde.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 6 (Summer 1981): 716-36.
“Interview with Audre Lorde.” In Woman Poet—The East, edited by Elaine Dallman. Reno, Nevada: Women-in-Literature, 1981, pp. 18-21.
“Toward a More Feminist Criticism”. Opening address, Feminist Studies in Literature Symposium, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1981. In Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986
“Notes for a Magazine.” Sinister Wisdom, no. 17 (Summer 1981): 4-5. Rich discusses her expectations and desires for the journal, which she and Michelle Cliff began to edit with this issue.
“Notes for a Magazine: What Does Separatism Mean?” Sinister Wisdom, no. 18 (Fall 1981): 83-91.
See citations for “Responses” from Barbara Smith and Sydney Spinster below in Articles in Serials section.
“‘Wholeness Is No Trifling Matter’: Some Fiction by Black Women.” See 1980 entry.

1982
Adrienne Rich to Barbara Mor. “Responses.” Sinister Wisdom, no. 21 (Fall 1982):119-21. Critical response to Mor’s letter to the Editors about anti-Semitism and brief remarks about Sinister Wisdom‘s editorial practices. For Mor citation and annotation, see Mor, Barbara under Serials.
“An Open Letter to the Women’s Movement.” In “Community Voices: Anti-Zionism and Anti-Semitism.” Gay Community News 9 (May 29, 1982): 5, and in “Anti-Zionism Is Anti-Semitism.” New Women’s Times 8. (June 1982): 3. Letter signed by Evelyn T. Beck, Nancy K. Bereano, Gloria Z. Greenfield, Melanie Kaye, Irena Klepfisz, Bernice Mennis, and Adrienne Rich.
“Split at the Root. “ In Nice Jewish Girls: A Lesbian Anthology, edited by Evelyn Torton Beck. Watertown, Massachusetts: Persephone Press, 1982, pp. 67-84. Reprinted in Fathers: Reflections by Daughters, ed. Ursula Owen, Pantheon, 1985. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.

1983
“The Eye of the Outsider: The Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop.” Review of The Complete Poems, 1927-1979. Boston Review 8 (April 1983):15-17. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“A Footnote on ‘Being There’: Being Here.” off our backs: a women’s news journal 13 (October 1983): 10-11. Rich’s impressions of Nicaraguan women’s needs and the contradictions within both North American feminist thought and the Sandinista Revolution. Presented at the New York Feminist Forum, “Women in Struggle—Medgar Evers, Nicaragua, Seneca,” October 28, 1983. For a review of Rich’s presentation, see Sarah Schulman, “Feminist Forum: Provocative, Contradictory,” Gay Community News 11 (November 12, 1983): 3.
“Notes for a Magazine.” Sinister Wisdom, no. 24 (Fall 1983): 3-5. Reflections on the 2½ years that Rich and Cliff edited Sinister Wisdom.
“Resisting Amnesia: History and Personal Life.” Written for the Clark Lecture, Scripps College, Claremont, California, February 15, 1983. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“‘Going There’ and Being Here. Originally published in off our backs: a women’s news journal. Reprinted in Nicaraguan Women: Unlearning the Alphabet of Submission, New York: Women’s International Resource Exchange [WIRE], 1985. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“Blood, Bread, and Poetry: The Location of the Poet.”  Talk given for the Institute of Humanities, “Writers and Social Responsibility”, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1983. Originally published in Massachusetts Review. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986, and in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1984
“The Soul of a Women’s College.” 
Lecture given at Scripps College, Claremont, California, February 15, 1984. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“Invisibility in Academe.” Short talk given at Scripps College Conference, Claremont, California, 1984. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.
“Notes toward a Politics of Location.” Talk given at the First Summer School of Critical Semiotics, Conference on Women, Feminist Identity and Society in the 1980s, Utrecht, Holland, June 1, 1984. Different versions of this talk were given at Cornell University for the Women’s Studies Research Seminar, and as the Burgess Lecture, Pacific Oaks College, Pasadena, California. First published in Women, Feminist Identity and Society in the 1980s: Selected Papers, edited by Myriam Diaz-Diocaretz and Iris Zavala, Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1985. Reprinted in Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986 and in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1985
“If Not with Others, How?” Excerpted from keynote address for the New Jewish Agenda National Convention, Ann Arbor, Michigan, July, 1985. First published in Genesis 2: An Independent Voice for Jewish Renewal, February-March, 1986. In Blood, Bread, and Poetry, 1986.

1987
The Genesis of “Yom Kippur 1984.”
Transcription of remarks made by Adrienne Rich in New York City in 1987 as part of an informal discussion of “Yom Kippur 1984.” Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi, W.W. Norton, 1993, pp. 252-258.

1991
“Raya Dunayevskaya’s Marx.”
 This essay first appeared as the foreword to the second edition of Raya Dunayevskaya, Rosa Luxemburg, Women’s Liberation and Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution. University of Illinois Press, 1991. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1992
“Swarthmore College Commencement Address, June 1, 1992.” 
Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi, W.W. Norton, 1993, pp. 273-274.

1993
“Muriel Rukeyser: Her Vision.” 
Introduction to The Muriel Rukeyser Reader, edited by Jan Heller Levi, W.W. Norton, 1995. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1996
“Defying the Space that Separates.” Introduction to Best American Poetry 1996, edited by Adrienne Rich and David Lehman, Scribners, 1996. Revised version printed in The Nation, 1996. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1997
“Thomas Avena’s Dream of Order.” 
Preface to Thomas Avena, Dream of Order, San Francisco: Mercury House, 1997. In A Human Eye, Essays on Art in Society, 1997-2008. W.W. Norton, 2009.

 “Arts of the Possible.” Troy Lecture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, April 1997. First published in Massachusetts Review, autumn 1997. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

Letter. “Why I Refused the National Medal for the Arts.” July 3, 1997. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

Letter. “Poetry and the Public Sphere.” Conference on Poetry and the Public Sphere, “Poetry, Feminism(s) and the Difficult Wor(l)d” panel with Teen Alexander, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Susan Stanford Friedman, Alicia Ostriker, and Bob Perelman, Rutgers University, 1997. Printed in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1998
Some Questions from the Profession.”
 Public conversation hosted by the Poetry Division of the Modern Language Association, December 1998. Printed in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

1999
“Interview with Rachel Spence.” Jewish Quarterly: A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and Culture, California/London, 1999. Reprinted in Arts of the Possible, 2009.

2003
“Iraqi Poetry Today.”
Review of Iraqi Poetry Today, Modern Poetry in Translation 19n.s., edited by Saadi A. Simawe and Daniel Weissbort, London: King’s College, 2003. Originally published online at http://www.poetryinternationalweb.net. Reprinted in A Human Eye, Essays on Art in Society, 1997-2008. W.W. Norton, 2009.

“Jewish Days and Nights.” In Wrestling with Zion: Progressive Jewish-American Responses to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, edited by Tony Kushner and Alisa Solomon,Grove Press, 2003. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

2004
“Muriel Rukeyser for the Twenty-first Century.”
Preface to Muriel Rukeyser: Selected Poems, edited by Adrienne Rich, Library of America, 2004. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“The Baldwin Stamp.” Los Angeles Times Book Review, September 11, 2004. Revised and expanded version reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“Dialogue and Dissonance: The Letters of Robert Duncan and Denise Levertov:” Review of The Letters of Robert Duncan and Denise Levertov, ed. Robert J. Bertholf and Albert Gelpi, Stanford University Press, 2004. First published as “A Poetic Dialogue,” in The Los Angeles Times Book Review, April 23, 2004. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

2005
“Three Classics for New Readers: Karl Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, Che Guevara.”
Preface to Manifesto: Three Classic Essays on How to Change the World—Che Guevara, Rosa Luxemburg, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Ocean Press, 2005. Revised and expanded version reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“The Voiceprints of Her Language.” Foreword to Directed by Desire: The Collected Poems of June Jordan, edited by Jan Heller Levi and Sara Miles, Copper Canyon Press, 2005. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“James Scully’s Art of Praxis.” Foreword to James Scully, Line Break: Poetry as Social Practice, Curbstone Press, 2005. Expanded version reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

2006
Permeable Membrane.”
Appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review, Spring 2006: 208-201. Revised version reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“‘Candidates for My Love’: Three Gay and Lesbian Poets.” The David R. Kessler Lecture, given at the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies, the Graduate Center, City University of New York, 2006. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

“Poetry and the Forgotten Future.” Plenary Lecture, Conference on Poetry and Politics, University of Stirling, Scotland, July 13, 2006. First published in the chapbook, “Poetry and Commitment,” Norton, 2007. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.

2009
“‘Knowing What City You’re in, Who to Talk to’: LeRoi Jones’s The Dead Lecturer.
 Boston Review vol. 34, no.1, March/April 2009. Reprinted in A Human Eye, 2009.


II. SECONDARY MATERIALS

Books

Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose: A Norton Critical EditionEdited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi (W. W. Norton, 1975, 1993). First published in 1975 as Adrienne Rich’s Poetry, this Norton Critical Edition was revised and expanded in 1993 to include a selection of poems from 1951-1991; ten prose pieces by the poet; an interview; a dozen critical essays; biographical information; and a bibliography of Rich’s own writing through 1993. Editors’ notes provide definitions and historical references in the poems. The original 1975 NCE was reviewed with Rich’s Poems: Selected and New (1975). See entries for Morris, and Dahlen, in Reviews section.
In 2017, W.W. Norton will publish a revised and fully updated 2nd edition of the NCE.

Birkle, Carmen. Women’s Stories of the Looking Glass: Autobiographical Reflections and Self-Representations in the Poetry of Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde. Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 1996

Diaz-Diocaretz, Myriam. The Transforming Power of Language: The Poetry of Adrienne Rich. Utrecht: H & S Publishers, 1984.

Hinton, Laura editor. Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero. Lexington Books, 2016.

Keyes, Claire. The Aesthetics of Power: The Poetry of Adrienne Rich. University of Georgia Press, 1986.

Langdell, Cheri ColbyAdrienne Rich: The Moment of Change. Westport: Praeger 2004.

Lemardeley-Cunci, Marie-ChristineAdrienne Rich: Cartographies du Silence. Lyon: Presses Universitaires de Lyon, 1990.

Martin, Wendy. An American Triptych: Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich. University of North Carolina Press, 1984

O’Reilley, Andrea, editor. From Motherhood to Mothering: The Legacy of Adrienne Rich’s Of Woman Born. State University of New York Press, 2004.

Sickels, AmyAdrienne Rich. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2005.

Templeton, AliceThe Dream and the Dialogue: Adrienne Rich’s Feminist Poetics, University of Tennessee Press, 1994.

Werner, Craig. Adrienne Rich: The Poet and Her Critics. American Library Association, 1988.

Yorke, Liz
Adrienne Rich: Passion, Politics, and the Body, Sage Publications, 1997.

Chapters and Articles In Books, Pamphlets

Most materials cited below are primarily about Rich’s work, although some are about Rich and one or two other poets. The articles which have appeared in journals as well as books are cited both here and in the Serials section.

Altieri, Charles. “Self-Reflection as Action: The Recent Work of Adrienne Rich.” In Self and Sensibility in Contemporary American Poetry. Cambridge University Press, 1984.  An edited version appears in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W.W. Norton, 1993.

Byers, Thomas B
. “Adrienne Rich: Vision as Rewriting.” In World, Self, Poem: Essays on Contemporary Poetry from the “Jubilation of Poets,” edited by Leonard M. Trawick. Kent State University Press, 1990, pp. 144-52

Boyers, Robert. “On Adrienne Rich: Intelligence and Will.” In Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi; first published in Salmagundi 22-23 (Spring-Summer 1973): 132-48.

Favorable critique of poems through The Will to Change. Praises Rich’s authenticity and constraint, her focus on “the tension. . . between . . . what we know and how we feel,” particularly in Necessities of Life, Unfavorable commentary on the changes beginning in Leaflets: “how charged she has become with the nauseous propaganda of the advance-guard cultural radicals.”

Chenoy, Polly N. “‘Writing These Words in the Woods’: A Study of the Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” In Studies in American Literature: Essays in Honour of William Mulder, edited by Jagdish Chander and Narinder S. Pradhan. Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1976, pp. 194-211.

Praises Rich’s affirmation and political commitment in the face of war and the destruction of the environment: “to use what one has, to help heal the wounds of the world in some small measure, to join sundered relationships, and somehow manage to hold out, these are the themes of many of Ms. Rich’s poems.” See Diving into the Wreck as “an apparent abandonment of hope.”

Christ, Carol P. “Homesick for a Woman, Homesick for Ourselves: Adrienne Rich.” In Diving Deep and Surfacing: Women Writers and Spiritual Quest. Beacon Press, 1980, pp. 75-96.

Analysis of Rich’s “spiritual journey” and “new naming of self and world” in Diving into the Wreck and The Dream of a Common Language. Emphasis on her search through the “wreck,” her recognition of “the nothingness at the heart of patriarchal marriage and politics,” and her desire to “weave a new culture—not from scratch, but from the threads our foremothers have left us.”

Davison, Peter. “More Merciless to Herself Than History: Adrienne Rich 1955-1960.” In The Fading Smile: Poets in Boston 1955-1960, Knopf, 1994, pp. 186-208.
Dennis, Helen M
. “Adrienne Rich: Consciousness Raising as Poetic Method.”  In Contemporary Poetry Meets Modern Theory, edited by Anthony Easthope and John O. Thompson. University of Toronto Press, 1991, pp. 177-94.

Des Pres, Terence. “Adrienne Rich: North America East” in Praises and Dispraises: Poetry and Politics, The 20th Century. Viking, 1988. An edited version appears in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi, W.W. Norton, 1993. 
DuPlessis, Rachel Blau.
 “The Critique of Consciousness and Myth in Levertov, Rich, and Rukeyser.” In Shakespeare’s Sisters: Feminist Essays on Women Poets, edited by Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar. Indiana University Press, 1979, pp. 280-300. First published in Feminist Studies, 1975, pp. 199-221; revised version, “Lyric Documents: The Critique of Personal Consciousness in Levertov, Rich, and Rukeyser,” in Myth and Ideology in American Culture, edited by Regis Durand. Villeneuve d’ Ascq: Univ. de Lille, 1976, pp. 65-80.

Comparative study of “the invention of re-evaluative quest myths” which enable women poets to address the “conflict between the claims of the self and the claims of others.” Historical interpretation of the split between women’s psyches and social norms, and the poets’ desires to “extend the model of personal changes of consciousness to produce social change.”

Flowers, Betty S. “The “I” in Adrienne Rich: Individuation and the Androgyne Archetype.” In Theory and Practice of Feminist Literary Criticism, edited by Gabriela Mora and Karen S. Van Hooft. Bilingual Review Press, 1982.

Franzek, Phyllis. “Adrienne Rich’s An Atlas of the Difficult World: Strategic Interference, Articulate Response.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambrideg Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 64-80.

Gelpi, Albert. “Adrienne Rich: The Poetics of Change.” In American Poetry Since 1960: Some Critical Perspectives, edited by Robert Shaw. Cheadle, Cheshire: Carcanet Press, 1973, pp. 123-43; reprinted in the NCE, pp. 130-48.

Critical overview through The Will to Change with analysis of changes in American poetry during Rich’s career. Explications of numerous poems, reflections on thematic continuities and changes, discussion of the usefulness of Jungian interpretation, and particular attention to the development of Rich’s feminism: “Adrienne Rich’s new poems show an absorption of animus powers into a growing sense of identity as woman and identification with women, and consciousness is the key.”

Gilmore, Leigh. “The Gaze of the Other Woman: Dickinson, Moore, and Rich.” In Engendering the Word: Feminist Essays in Psychosexual Poetics, edited by Jenna F. Berg. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989, pp. 81-102.

Harrison, Barbara Grizzuti. “lmagination and Ideology. ” In Off Center. New York: The Dial Press, 1980, pp. 79-85; first published in the New Republic, June 2, 1979, pp. 35-37.

Extremely hostile review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence: “It’s an unhappy fact of life and of prose that ideology tends to coarsen, and sometimes to fossilize, the moral imagination. . . . ” [F]eminists of Ms. Rich’s ilk now contend that only women’s concerns are of universal importance . . . assigning to themselves the right, of course, to define ‘women’s concerns.’ This implied reactionary separatism inevitably leads to the conclusion that there are no truly universal concerns. .”

Henneberg, Sylvia. “The Self-Categorization, Self-Canonization, and Self-Periodization of Adrienne Rich.” In Challenging Boundaries: Gender and Periodization, edited by Joyce W. Warren and Margaret Dickie. University of Georgia Press, 2000.
Howard, Richard.
“Adrienne Rich: ‘What Lends Us Anchor But the Mutable?”‘ In Alone with America: Essays on the Art of Poetry in the United States Since 1950. Atheneum, 1969, pp. 423-41; enlarged ed. 1980, pp. 493-516.

“Underground Streams,” Howard’s review of Diving into the Wreck, is reprinted from Harper’s magazine, December 1973; review of The Will to Change is excerpted from Partisan Review, Winter 1971-72; and general commentary on volumes through Leaflets appears only in Alone with America. “What is striking, what is even stricken about Adrienne Rich’s poetry is her probity and resource in the face of fracture. . . . For she is, like her radical affiliates, determined to overcome. She is Sylvia Plath in reverse, not eager or even willing to be still . . . but rather letting the stillness be broken within and around her.”

Jong, Erica. “Visionary Anger.” In Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi, pp. 171-74; first published in Ms. 2 (July 1973):31-33.

Positive critique of Rich’s ideas about feminism, androgyny, redemption and survival in a “death-dealing culture.” Consideration of Diving into the Wreck as continuation of Rich’s themes in earlier volumes. “Rich is one of very few poets who can deal with political issues in her poems without letting them degenerate into socialist realism . . . . Her feminism is a natural extension of her poetry because, for her, feminism means empathy. And empathy is the essential tool of the poet.”

Juhasz, Suzanne. “The Feminist Poet: Alta and Adrienne Rich.” In Naked and Fiery Forms: Modern American Poetry by Women, A New Tradition. Harper-Colophon, 1976, pp. 177-204.

General commentary on the political implications of feminist poetry, the new forms and themes women are exploring, and the feminist refusal “to treat poetry as a metalanguage that needs to be decoded to reveal meaning.” Critique of early oblique poems about interpersonal conflict, using Rich’s prose to address changes in her work during the late sixties and early seventies.

Kalaidjian, David. “Feminism and Representation: Adrienne Rich’s Wild Patience.” In Languages of Liberation: The Social Text on Contemporary American Poetry. Columbia Univ. Press, 1989.
Kalstone, David. “Adrienne Rich: Face to Face.” In Five Temperaments: Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, James Merril, Adrienne Rich, and John Ashbery. Oxford University Press, 1977, pp. 129-69.

Critical overview through Poems: Selected and New. Comparison of Rich with (male) poets of her generation, especially Merrill. Focus on poetry of dialogue and relationship, the changes beginning in Necessities of Life and increasing with Rich’s political growth. Brief remarks about the loss of “the coiled sexual tension,” the “deliberate narrowing of focus,” as Rich writes more directly to, for, and about women.

Knutson, Lin. “Broken Forms: Land, History, and National Consciousness in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry: 1989-1995.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 101-120
Markey, Janice.  “Adrienne Rich: The Singleminded Vision.” In A New Tradition?: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Adrienne Rich: A Study of Feminism and Poetry. Frankfurt/New York: Peter Lang, 1985.
Martin, Wendy.
“From Patriarchy to the Female Principle: A Chronological Reading of Adrienne Rich’s Poems.” In Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W.W. Norton, 1975, pp. 175-89.

Study of the cultural and historical changes that have nurtured Rich’s growth as a feminist poet. Discussion of the developing connections between inner and outer, self and nature, which are severed in patriarchal society. Emphasis on the power and reverence for life that Rich derives from her use of women’s history.
“Rich returns to the ancient origins of the community of women in order to more fully comprehend her own experience as a modern woman; this poetic exploration of matriarchal community— the female principle— has important political consequences.”

Martin, Wendy. “Adrienne Rich: The Evolution of a Poet.”  In American Writing Today, edited by Richard Kostelanets, 334-42. Troy, N.Y.: Whiston University Press, 1991, pp. 334-42.
Matthews, Pamela. “Changing the Laws of History: Adrienne Rich’s Joan of Arc.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp.
McCorkle, James. 
“‘Fiery Iconography:’ Language and Interconnection in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” In The Still Performance: Writing, Self, and Interconnection in Five Postmodern American Poets. University Press of Virginia, 1989, pp. 87-129.
Merriman, Emily Taylor. “‘The spider’s genius’: Verse Technique as Liberating Force in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 6-26.
Middlebrook, Diane Wood. “Three Mirrors Reflecting Women: Poetry of Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Adrienne Rich.” In Worlds into Words: Understanding Modern Poets. W.W. Norton, 1978, pp. 65-95.

Traces the evolution of Rich’s feminism through discussion of Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law and her prose writings about the fifties. “The significance of sexual identity dawns in poems from this period of Rich’s life like the inescapable recognition of symptoms of a mortal illness.” Brief comment on differences between Rich and the women poets with whom she is often compared.

Milford, Nancy. “This Woman’s Movement.” In Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W.W. Norton, 1975, pp. 189-202.

Overview through Diving into the Wreck, including discussion of her own early identification with Rich, conflicts of women writers, and Rich’s changing ideas about the power of language and history. “Adrienne Rich is working out the destiny of her paradoxical identities: American woman and American Poet. . . . An American woman living through that time of radical change in human sensibility that Auden said had not come. But that was a quarter of a century ago and Auden is dead.”

McDaniel, Judith. Reconstituting the World: The Poetry and Vision of Adrienne Rich. Argyle, New York: Spinsters, Ink, 1978. 24 pages.

Overview through The Dream of a Common Language, tracing Rich’s changing forms and focusing on her growth toward lesbian/feminism. Commentary on her movement “beyond that range explored by the confessional poets” and interpretation of recurrent myths and images which have new meaning as Rich reconceptualizes power from a feminist perspective. “As a poet and a feminist, Adrienne Rich knows that she must live a life that allows her to make connections with other women, connections which will unite her inner reality and her outer environment.”

Ortega, Kirsten Bartholomew. “Ariadne’s Legacy: Myths and Mapping in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 44-63.
Perdigao, Lisa K. “‘The words I’d found’: The Poetics of Recovery in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp.
Radycki, Diane.
 “Diane Radycki on Adrienne Rich on Paula Modersohn-Becker.” In Voices of Women: 3 Critics on 3 Poets on 3 Heroines, edited by Cynthia Navaretta. New York: Middlemarch Associates, 1980, pp. 23-35.

Short essay praising Rich’s poem, “Paula Becker to Clara Westhoff” (from The Dream of a Common Language) and providing information about the painter’s life. “In empathy, in absolute identification with a woman who lived more than seventy years ago, Rich risks Becker’s innermost feelings. . . . She challenges us to the impossible dialogue with the voices of women unheard in their lifetimes.”

Ratcliffe, Krista. “Revisioning the Borderlands: Adrienne Rich.” In Anglo-American Feminist Challenges to the Rhetorical Traditions: Virginia Woolf, Mary Daly, Adrienne Rich. Southern Illinois University Press, 1996, pp. 107-141.
Riley, Jeannette E. “The ‘words are maps’: Travelling the Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 121-140.
Shreiber, Maeera Y. “‘Where Are We Moored?’: Adrienne Rich, Women’s Mourning and the Limits of lament.” In Dwelling in Possibility: Women Poets and Critics on Poetry, edited by Yopie Prins and Maeera Y. Shreiber. Cornell University Press, 1997, 301-317.
Sielke, SabineFashioning the Feminine Subject: The Intertextual Networking of Dickinson, Moore & Rich. University of Michigan Press, 1997.
Spiegelman, Willard. “Driving to the Limits of the City of Words: The Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” In The Didactic Muse: Scenes of Instruction in Contemporary American Poetry. Princeton University Press, 1989. Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose (NCE), edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W.W. Norton, 1993.
Vendler, Helen.
 “Adrienne Rich.” In Part of Nature, Part of Us: Modern American Poets. Harvard University Press, 1980, pp. 47-62. Review of Diving into the Wreck was first published as “Ghostlier Demarcations, Keener Sounds.” Parnassus: Poetry in Review 2 (Fall/Winter 1973). It was also reprinted in the NCE, pp. 160-71. Review of Of Woman Born was published in the New York Review of Books, September 30, 1976, pp. 16-18.

Review of Diving and retrospective study of earlier volumes. Discussion of other poets and changes in American poetry during Rich’s career. Negative commentary about Rich’s feminism, anger, and prose “propaganda”: “I hope that the curve into more complex expression visible in her earlier books will recur…, and that these dispatches from the battlefield [in Diving] will be assimilated into a more complete poetry.” Hostile review of Of Woman Born, charging Rich with “sentimentality,” “the rhetoric of violence,” “ideologically motivated writing,” and “refus[ing] full existential reality to men.

Vendler, Helen. “Adrienne Rich, Jared Carter, Phillip Levine.” In The Music of What Happens: Poems, Poets, Critics, Harvard University Press, 1988.
Vendler, Helen. “Mapping the Air: Adrienne Rich and Jorie Graham.” In Soul Says: On Recent Poetry. Harvard University Press, 1995, pp. 212-234.
Vendler, HelenPart of Nature, Part of Us: Modern American Poets. Harvard University Press, 1980.
Waddell, William S. “Where We See It From: Adrienne Rich and a Reconstruction of American Space.” In “Catch If You Can Your Country’s Moment:” Recovery and Regeneration in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich, edited by William S. Waddell. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publ., 2007, pp. 81-100.
Wallace, Cynthia. “Adrienne Rich and the “Long Dialogue Between Art and Justice.” In Of Women Borne: A Literary Ethics of Suffering. Columbia University Press, 2016.
Whelchel, Marianne. “‘Phantasia for Elvira Shatayev’ as Revolutionary Feminist Poem.” In Toward a Feminist Transformation of the Academy: II, Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Great Lakes College Association Women’s Studies Conference, edited by Beth Reed, et al. Great Lakes College Association, 1982.

Close reading of Rich’s poem about the Russian women’s climbing team (from The Dream of a Common Language) intended to “show how the women’s experience becomes a model for the audience and how Rich creates community with the audience and ‘ challenges [readers] to change.” Commentary on differences between “consciously political” and “revolutionary” poetry. Parts of this essay are extended in Whelchel’s “Mining the ‘Earth-Deposits’: Women’s History in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry,” in Reading Adrienne Rich: Reviews and Re-Visions, 1951-81, edited by Jane Roberta Cooper. University of Michigan Press, 1983, pp. 51-71.

Yorke, Liz. “Constructing a lesbian poetic for survival: Broumas, Rukeyser, H.D., Rich, Lorde” in Sexual Sameness: Textual Differences in Lesbian and Gay Writing, edited by Joseph Bristow. Routledge, 1992, pp. 187-209.

Articles in Serials

Most materials cited below are primarily about Rich’s work, although some are about Rich and one or two other poets. Pieces which have been published in books as well as in serials are cited both here and in the Articles in Books section. Letters to the Editor about Rich’s work are included here.

Addelson, Kathryn Pyne. “Words and Lives: On ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’—Defining the Issues.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 7 (Autumn 1981):187-99.

See also Ferguson and, Zita entries in this section; Addelson responds to their critiques of Rich’s essay. Suggests that a useful definition of lesbian “must cut across normal-deviant lines,” and shows how Rich’s “lesbian continuum” enables us to “examine the past (and present) not in terms of hierarchical institutions but in terms of women’s own understandings within the historical contexts of life patterns they were creating”

Allen, Carolyn. “Failures of Word, uses of Silence: Djuna Barnes, Adrienne Rich, and Margaret Atwood.” In Regionalism and the Female Imagination, edited by Emily Toth. (University Park, Pennsylvania: Human Sciences Press), 4 1978): 1-7.

Overview of Rich’s changing attitudes toward language, imagery, and silence as her political awareness has grown and she has sought alternatives to the discourse of male-dominated culture.

Annas, Pamela. “A Poetry of Survival: Unnaming and Renaming in the Poetry of Audre Lorde, Pat Parker, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich.” Colby Library Quarterly 18 March 1982): 9-25.
Aptheker, Bettina. “Rich Rages against Wreckage of the Fathers.” New Directions for Women 21 (January 1992): 23.
Atsumi, Ikuko. “Adrienne Rich: America Josei Shi Renaissance No Gunzo” (Some Figures in the American Renaissance of Women’s Poetry). Eigo Sienen (The Rising Generation) (Tokyo), 122 (March 1, 1977): 30-31.
Barry, Kathleen. “Reviewing Reviews: Motherhood Censored—Of Woman Born.” Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture, no. 2 (1977):7-9.

Analysis of the mainstream critical responses to Rich’s prose study. “The vital theoretical breakthroughs of Rich’s book were greeted with the same hysteria that results whenever the dominant culture feels seriously threatened by new ideas.”

Bere, Carol. “A Reading of Adrienne Rich’s ‘A Valediction Forbidding Mourning.”‘ Concerning Poetry (Bellingham, Washington) 11 (1978):33-38.

Detailed interpretation of “a pivotal poem in Rich’s poetic landscape.” Her “leavetaking. . . is saying farewell to a whole way of being in this world.”

Bere, Carol. “The Road Taken: Adrienne Rich in the 1990s.”  Literary Review 43, No. 4 (Summer 2000): 550-61.

Birkle, Carmen.
Boyers, Robert.“On Adrienne Rich: Intelligence and Will.” Salmagundi 22-23 (Spring-Summer 1973):132-48.
Brogan, Jacqueline Vaught. “Planets on the Table: From Wallace Stevens and Elizabeth Bishop to Adrienne Rich and June Jordan.” Wallace Stevens Journal 19:2 (Fall 1995): 255-78.
Brogan, Jacqueline Vaught. “Wrestling with Those Rotted Names”: Wallace Stevens and Adrienne Rich’s Revolutionary Poetics.” Wallace Stevens Journal 25:1 (Spring 2001): 19-39.
Brough, Holly. “Naming Names.” Letter to the Editor. New Women’s Times Feminist Review, no. 15 (April/May 1981):2.
Objection to “Rich’s insensitive and racist use of the term ‘lightskinned Black’ to describe Whites who are part Black and Mulattoes [sic]” in “’Wholeness Is No Trifling Matter,’” cited on pp. 337-38.
Des Pres, Terence.
Burt, Stephen. “Charles Baxter, August Kleinzahler, Adrienne Rich: Contemporary Stevensians and the Problem of ‘Other Lives.’ ” Wallace Stevens Journal 24.2 (Fall 2000): 115-134.
Clark, Miriam Marty. “Human Rights and the Work of the Lyric in Adrienne Rich.” The Cambridge Quarterly 38.1 (2009): 45-65.
DuPlessis, Rachel Blau. “The Critique of Consciousness and Myth in Levertov, Rich, and Rukeyser,” Feminist Studies 3 (1975): 199-221. For reprint information and annotation, see the above entry in “Chapters and Articles in Books.”
Eagleton, Mary. “Adrienne Rich, Location and the Body. ” Journal of Gender Studies 9.3 (2000): 299-312.
Erickson, Peter. “‘If You Think You Can Grasp Me, Think Again; — Adrienne Rich’s Power of Development.” Hurricane Alice 6 (Fall-Winter 1989): 4-5.
Erickson, Peter. “Singing America: From Walt Whitman to Adrienne Rich.” The Kenyon Review 17.1 (Winter, 1995): 103-119.
Estrin, Barbara L. “Re-Versing the Past: Adrienne Rich’s Postmodern Inquietude.” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 16:2 (Autumn 1997): 345-371.
Farwell, Marilyn R. “Adrienne Rich and an Organic Feminist Criticism.” College English 39 (October 1977):191-203.

Thought-provoking analysis of a relatively unexplored subject. Focuses on the moral functions of language, the poet/poem relationship, and the emphases that distinguish Rich from other feminist critics. “Rich has provided the only sustained attempt at what I would call an organic feminist criticism, a literary theory based directly on a feminist philosophy.”

Feit Diehl, Joanne. “‘Cartographies of Silence’: Rich’s Common Language and, the Woman Poet.” Feminist Studies 6 (Fall 1980): 530-46.

Exploration of Rich’s concept of “re-vision”, and her poetic effort to overcome “otherness, ” to discover women’s “First Idea.” “As outsider, Rich seeks a way to re-appropriate language, to . . . free [it] from its patriarchal origins. . . . The relation of a lesbian ontology to the poetic praxis, however, is not so direct as Rich would have us believe.”

Ferguson, Ann. “Patriarchy, Sexual Identity, and the Sexual Revolution: On ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’— Defining the Issues. ” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 7 (Autumn 1981): 158-72.

Response to Rich’s assertion of what constitutes a useful definition of lesbian; discussion of labeling theory and what it means for women to choose the lesbian label; extensive information about the historical development of lesbian identity; criticism of Rich’s “lesbian continuum” formulation, which “does not clearly distinguish between three different goals of definitional strategy: first, valorizing the concept lesbian; second, giving a sociopolitical definition of the contemporary lesbian community; and finally, reconceptualizing history from a lesbian and feminist perspective. ” See Zita and Addelson entries in this section; these women respond to Ferguson’s essay. See also Thompson entry in this section for response to Rich’s essay.

Flynn, Gale. “The Radicalization of Adrienne Rich.” Hollins Critic 11 (October 1974):1-15.

Generally favorable overview of poems through Diving into the Wreck, tracing the development of Rich’s attitudes toward history and the changing structures of her poems. Self-contradictory commentary on Rich’s feminism: “To label Adrienne Rich a ‘Women’s Liberation Poet’ is like billing Crime and Punishment a murder mystery.” Four pages later, Rich “seems ready to burn not only her bra, but her breasts.”

Friedman, Susan. “Adrienne Rich and H.D.: An Intertextual Study.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 9 (Winter 1983).
Fulkerson, Carol. Letter to the Editor. Ms. 5 (February 1977):4.
Thoughts about motherhood and relationships with women triggered by reading Of Woman Born excerpt in Ms.
Gelpi, Albert.  “Two Ways of Spelling It Out: An Archetypal-Feminist Reading of H. D.’s Trilogy and Adrienne Rich’s Sources.” The Southern Review, 26.2 (April 1990), 101-144.
Gelpi, Albert. “The Transfiguration of the Body: Adrienne Rich’s Witness.” Wallace Stevens Journal 25.1 (Spring 2001): 7-18.
Gilbert, Roger
. “Framing Water: Historical Knowledge in Elizabeth Bishop and Adrienne Rich.” Twentieth Century Literature 43.2 (Summer, 1997): 144-161.
Gilbert, Sandra M. “‘My Name Is Darkness’: The Poetry of Self-Definition.” Contemporary Literature 18 (Fall 1976): 442- 57.

Perceptive study of the differences in the meaning of “confessional” poetry when written by women and men. Emphases on women’s socialization away from power, object relations in women’s poetry, and “otherness” in men’s poetry about women. “The male confessional poet . . . writes in the certainty that he is the inheritor of major traditions, the grandson of history. . . . The female poet, however, even when she is not self-consciously confessional like Plath or Sexton, writes in the hope of discovering or defining a self, a certainty, a tradition.”

Greenberg, Joyce. “By Woman Taught.” Parnassus: Poetry in Review 7
(Fall/Winter 1979):99- 103.

Journal written after Greenberg’s completion of two courses taught by Rich at Douglass College in 1976. Focuses on the author’s changes and Rich’s teaching style. Moving piece, possibly the only publication about a student’s experience in a course with Rich. “Overall, she seems more interested in my development as a woman than in my development as a poet. I wonder if this is her way of showing me the two are synonymous.”

Greenwald, Elissa. “‘The Dream of a Common Language: Vietnam Poetry as Reformation of Language and Feeling in the Poems of Adrienne Rich.” Journal of American Culture 16 (Fall 1993): pp. 97-102
Gwiazda, Piotr. “”Nothing Else Left to Read’: Poetry and Audience in Adrienne Rich’s ‘An Atlas of the Difficult World.’” Journal of Modern Literature 28.2: 165–188.
Hallstein, Lynn O’Brien.
“The Intriguing History and Silences of Of Woman Born: Rereading Adrienne Rich Rhetorically to Better Understand the Contemporary Context”
Feminist Formations, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2010), pp. 18-41.
Harris, Jeane
. “The Emergence of a Feminizing Ethos in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 18 (spring 1988): 133-40.
Hedley, Jane. “Surviving to Speak New Language: Mary Daly and Adrienne Rich.” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminism & Philosophy 7 (Spring 1992): 40-62.
Hedley, Jane. “Re-Forming the Cradle: Adrienne Rich’s ‘Transcendental Etude.’” Genre 28 (Fall, 1993): 339-370.
Hogue, Cynthia. “The ‘Possible Poet’: Pain, Form, and the Embodied Poetics of Adrienne Rich in Wallace Stevens’ Wake”. The Wallace Stevens Journal 25.1 (Spring, 2001): 40-51.
Jacobs, Joshua S. “Mapping after the Holocaust: the ‘Atlases’ of Adrienne Rich and Gerhard Richter.” Mosaic 32.4 (December, 1999): 11-127.
Jacobs, Joshua S. “‘An Atlas of the Difficult World’: Adrienne Rich’s Countermonument.” Contemporary Literature 42 (2001): 727-49.
Janows, Jill. “Mind-Body Exertions: Imagery in the Poems of Adrienne Rich.” Madog (Wales) 3 (Winter 1979):4-18.

Detailed interpretations of “The Tourist in the Town” (from The Diamond Cutters), “Necessities of Life,” “Images for Godard” (from The Will to Change), “Diving into the Wreck,” and “The Lioness” (from The Dream of a Common Language). Exploration of Rich’s movement from tourist/observer to participant/agent. Discussion of her changing beliefs about the power of language, integration of mind and body, and imaginative identification with women like and unlike herself in The Dream of a Common Language.

Matson, Suzanne. “Talking to Our Father: The Political and Mythical Appropriations of Adrienne Rich and Sharon Olds. American Poetry Review (Nov.-Dec. 1989): 35ff.
McGuirck, Kevin.
“Philoctetes Radicalized: ‘Twenty-One Love Poems’ and the Lyric Career of Adrienne Rich.” Contemporary Literature 34.1 (Spring, 1993): 61-87.
Mieszkowski, Gretchen. “No Longer ‘by a miracle, a twin’: Helen Vendler’s Reviews of Adrienne Rich’s Recent Poetry.” South Central Review 5 (summer 1988): 72-86.
Mor, Barbara. Letter to the Editors. Sinister Wisdom, no. 21 (Fall 1982): 103-7.

Clarification of Mor’s views of Jewish feminism and anti-Semitism Criticism of Selma Miriam’s “unauthorized use of personal correspondence” in “Anti-Semitism in the Lesbian Community,” Sinister Wisdom, no. 19.

Morris, Susan. “The Moment of Change.” Special Section on Adrienne Rich. Anonymous: A Journal for the Woman Writer (Fresno, California), 2 (1975): 5-9.

Detailed interpretation of three poems from The Will to Change, about the poet’s power and her temporary inability to use it: “I Dream I’m the Death of Orpheus,” “The Burning of Paper Instead of Children,” and “Images for Godard.” Favorable commentary on Rich’s transformation of suffering into words that “applaud the living.”

Muske, Carol. “Backward into the Future.” See Reviews section.
Nowik, Nan. “Mixing Art and Politics: The Writings of Adrienne Rich, Marge Piercy, and Alice Walker.” Centennial Review 30 (spring 1986): 208-18.
Ostriker, Alicia. “Her Cargo: Adrienne Rich and the Common Language.” See Reviews section.
Perreault, Jeane. “‘Signified by pain’: Adrienne Rich’s Body Trans.” a/b: Auto/ Biography Studies 10 (Fall 1995): 87-103.
Pinkert, Rosalie. “To Question Language.” Special Section on Adrienne Rich. Anonymous: A Journal for the Woman Writer (Fresno, California), 2 (1975):10-15.

Favorable commentary on Rich’s poems about the politics of sexuality, particularly in Diving into the Wreck. Discussion of Rich’s repudiation of masculine culture and the fear, anger, and isolation it creates for women. “Her poetry is an almost brutal portrayal of reality, yet . . . she maintains an optimism for humanity and the future.”

Runzo, Sandra. “Adrienne Rich’s Voice of Treason.” Women’s Studies 18 (1990): 135-51.
Santos, Maria Irene Ramalho de Sousa. “The Woman in the Poem: Wallace Stevens, Ramon Fernandez, and Adrienne Rich.” Wallace Stevens Journal 12.2 (Fall 1988): 150-61.
Sheridan, Susan. “Adrienne Rich and the Women’s Liberation Movement: A Politics of Reception.” Women’s Studies 35 (2006): 17–45.
Slowik, Mary. “The Friction of the Mind: The Early Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” Massachusetts Review: A Quarterly Review of Literature 25.1 (1984): 142-160.

Smith, Barbara. “Response.” Letter to the Editor, Sinister Wisdom, no. 20 (Spring 1982): 100-104.

Criticism of “Notes for a Magazine: What Does Separatism Mean?” Discussion of Rich’s failure to explain why she conceptualizes separatism in racial terms. Commentary about her lack of attention to the differences between the theory and the practice of separatism.

Spinster, Sydney. Letter to the Editor. Sinister Wisdom, no. 20 (Spring 1982): 104-5.

Discussion of the point of view represented by Rich’s “Notes for a Magazine: What Does Separatism Mean?” “The article feels to me like a challenge to a debate between non-Separatist Lesbian-Feminists and Lesbian Separatists. But there is a great power imbalance in this debate. The moderator, and the forum itself is non-Separatist.”

Stein, Rachel. “’To Make the Visible World Your Conscience’: Adrienne Rich as Revolutionary Nature Writer.” in Reading Under the Sign of Nature: New Essays in Ecocriticism, edited by John Tallmadge and Henry Harringon. Univ. of Utah Press, 2000, pp. 199-207.
Stimpson, Catharine. “Adrienne Rich and Lesbian/Feminist Poetry,” Parnassus: Poetry in Review, 12-13, (Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter 1985): 249-268.
Strine, Mary S. “The politics of asking women’s questions: Voice and value in the poetry of Adrienne Rich,” Text and Performance Quarterly 9 (January 1989): 24-41.
Tanenhaus, Beverly. “The Politics of Suicide and Survival: The Poetry of Anne Sexton and Adrienne Rich.” Bucknell Review 24 (1978): 106-18.

Incisive analysis of the ways Sexton and Rich use the parts of themselves that have traditionally been considered “masculine.” In Rich’s poetry, “Jungian imagery is appropriated into feminist terms,” and “access to friendships between women” frees the poet to survive into a better future.

Thompson, Martha E. “Comment on Rich’s ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence.”‘ Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 6 (Summer 1981):790-94.

Critique of the contradictions of institutionalized heterosexuality. Response to Rich’s assessment of the relationships between lesbianism and feminism, individual and collective resistance to compulsory heterosexuality. Questions about the type of strategy she believes is implicit in Rich’s theory and doubts about the purpose of conceptualizing “compulsory heterosexuality [as] the central factor in women’s oppression.”

Van Dyne, Susan R. “The Mirrored Vision of Adrienne Rich.” Modern Poetry Studies 8 (1978): 140-73.

Chronicles and analyzes changes in Rich’s use of distance and identity, personae and negative capability. Criticizes the feminist who “is willing to renounce the role of poet for spokesperson,” but appreciates the structures Rich has developed to heal the powerful/powerless dichotomy.

Washington, Mary Helen. Letter to the Editor. Ms. 5 (February 1977):4.

Response to “Motherhood and Daughterhood” excerpt from Of Women Born. Comment on her appreciation of the book; criticism of “the total absence of any references to black women and their treatment of mother-daughter relationships.” Rich’s response follows.

Yorke, Liz. “Breaking through the ‘Logic of Limits’: Adrienne Rich and Radical Complexity.” Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses 37 (1998): 187-198.

Zimmerman, Bonnie. “Disobedient Daughter.” Women’s Review of Books 4 (April 1987): 5-6.
Zita, Jacquelyn N. “Historical Amnesia and the Lesbian Continuum: On ‘Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence’—Defining the Issues.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 7 (Fall 1981): 172-87.

Detailed response to Ann Ferguson’s “Patriarchy, Sexual Identity, and the Sexual Revolution” (commentary on Rich’s essay, cited in this section), and direct discussion of “Compulsory Heterosexuality.” Criticism of Ferguson’s “automatically exclusive” definition of lesbian, “reliance on” male theorists of sexuality, and “socialist-feminist approach [which] undermines the full consideration that should be given to the matrix of institutional coercions that enforce women’s erotic loyalty to men.” Favorable discussion of Rich’s “lesbian continuum,” which “includes lesbian existence as a source of power and knowledge available to women, as a phenomenon that would continue to exist outside of its present historically necessary mode of resistance to patriarchy.”

Reviews, Announcements of Publications and Awards

The annotations in the following section are intended to distinguish between reviews and brief notices in publications, which ordinarily publish reviews. Letters to the Editor in response to reviews of Rich’s work are also included here. For general information about most of the reviews listed below, see the excellent annotated bibliography in Margaret Morrison’s dissertation, “Adrienne Rich: Poetry of Re-Vision” (George Washington University, 1977).

A Change of World (1951)

Bogan, Louise. “Verse.” New Yorker, November 3,1951, pp. 150-51.
Humphries, Rolfe. “Verse Chronicle.” The Nation, July 28, 1951, pp. 76-77.
Kreymborg, Alfred. “Voices That Speak in Verse.” New York Times, May 13, 1951, p. 27.
Miller, Vassar. Review of A Change of World. Hopkins Review 6 (Spring-Summer 1953):197-200.

The Diamond Cutters and Other Poems (1955)

Golffing, Francis. “A Corroboration of Life.” Western Review 22 (Autumn 1957):72.
Hall, Donald. “A Diet of Dissatisfaction.” Poetry 87 (February 1956):299-302.*
Holmes, John. “Three Voices.” New York Times Book Review, April 8, 1956, p. 22.
Jarrell, Randall. “New Books in Review.” Yale Review 46 (September 1956):100-103. Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry, edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. New York: W. W. Norton, 1975, PP. 127-29.
Review of The Diamond Cutters and Other Poems. Booklist 52 (December 1, 1955), p. 142.
Review of The Diamond Cutters and Other Poems. Kirkus Reviews 23 (July 1, 1955):460.
Review of The Diamond Cutters and Other Poems. U.S. Quarterly Book Review 11 (December 1955):476.
Whittemore, Reed. “One’s Own True Tone.” New Orleans Poetry Journal 2 (April 1956):21-25.

Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law (1963)

Booth, Philip. “‘Rethinking the World.’” Christian Science Monitor, January 3, 1963, p. 15*
Flint, R. W. “Poetry.” New York Review of Books, first issue, undated, 1963, p. 26.
Gunn, Thom. “New Books in Review.” Yale Review 53 (October 1963):135-44.
Harrison, Tony. Review of Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law. London Magazine, April/May 1971, p. 163.
Howard, Richard. “Poetry Chronicle.” Poetry 102 (July 1963):250-60.
Jerome, Judson. “For Summer, A Wave of New Verse.” Saturday Review, July 6, 1963, pp. 30-32.
“Loitering Between Dream and Experience.” Times Literary Supplement, January 22, 1971, p. 92.
Nicholl, Louise Townsend. “Compulsive Balancing.” Spirit: A Magazine of Poetry 29 January 1963):181-82.
Nyren, Dorothy. Review of Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law. Library Journal 88 (January 1, 1963):108.
Patten, Brian. “Vulnerable Poets.” Books and Bookmen 16 (February 1971):26.
Pendleton, Conrad. “Ichor from Apple and Nettle.” Voices (Portland, Maine), no. 181 (May-August 196):29-33.
Porter, Peter. “Dazzling Landscapes.” The Observer, January 3, 1971, p. 3o.
Review of Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law. New Statesman, December 4, 1970, p. 772.
Robinson, Edgar. “Four Lady Poets.” Chicago Review 21 (December 1969):110-116.

Necessities of Life (1966)

Ashbery, John. “Tradition and Talent.” New York Herald Tribune Book Week, September 4, 1966, p. 2.
Burke, Herbert C. Review of Necessities of Life. Library Journal 91 (June 15, 1966): 3218.
Carruth, Hayden. “In Spite of Artifice.” Hudson Review 19 (Winter 1966/ 1967): 689. “To Solve Experience.” Poetry 109 (January 1967): 267-68.
Gelpi, Albert. “Disclosing the ‘Secret in the Core.'” Christian Science Monitor, August 18, 1966, p. 5.
Lowell, Robert. “Modesty Without Mumbling.” New York Times Book Review, July, 18 1966, p. 5.
Morse, Samuel French. “Poetry 1966.” Contemporary Literature 9 (Winter 1968): 112-29.
Review of Necessities of Life. Booklist 63 (September 15, 1966): 92.
Review of Necessities of Life. Kirkus Reviews 34 (May 1, 1966): 501.
Stephens, Alan. “Twelve New Books of Poetry, 1966.” Denver Quarterly 1 (Winter 1967): 101-12.
Sullivan, D. H. “Good, Clear, Shark-Infested Water and High Grade Motor Oil”. Northwest Review, no. 1 (Summer 1967): 113-16.
Tillinghast, Richard. “Worlds of Their Own.” Southern Review, n.s. 5 (April 1969): 582-96.
Vendler, Helen. “Recent American Poetry.” Massachusetts Review 8 (Summer 1967): 542-96.
Wilson, Robley, Jr. “Not Awfully Plain.”  8 (Winter 1967): 103-7.

Selected Poems ( UK, 1967)

Dodsworth, Martin. “The Human Note.” The Listener, November 30, 1967, p. 720.
Grant, Damian. “Short Measure.” Tablet (London), May 4, 1968, p. 446.
Hamilton, Ian. “New Poetry.” The Observer, December 31, 1967, p. 20.
Holmes, Richard. “Poets: Ferlinghetti, Amis, Coward, and Love, love, love.” The Times, December 16, 1967, p. 18.
Kavanagh, P.J. Review of Selected Poems. Manchester Guardian, November 2, 1976, p.11
Sargeant, Howard. “Light Coming or Darkness Going.” Poetry Review (London), 59 (Summer 1968):113.
Symons, Julian. “Parlour Games.” New Statesman, November 3, 1967, pg. 595;
“Unamerican Editions.” Times Literary Supplement, November 23, 1967, p. 1106.

Leaflets (1969)

Booth, Philip. “Truthfulness Is the Essence.” Christian Science Monitor, July 24. 1969, p.7.
Donoghue, Denis. “Oasis Poetry.” Review of Leaflets. New York Review of Books, May 7, 1970, pp. 35-38.*
James, Clive. “The Influence of Auden.” The Observer, April 16, 1972, p.32.
Kalstone, David. “Poetry Has Made Friends with Everyone.” New York Times Book Review. February 13, 1972, p. 3.
Leibowitz, Herbert. “The Muse and the News.” Hudson Review, 22 (Autumn 1969): 497-507.
“Moving Around.” Times Literary Supplement, June 9, 1972, p. 651.
Review of Leaflets. Booklist 65 (July 15, 1969): 1252.
Smith, Ray. Review of Leaflets. Library Journal 94 (May 15,1969):1975.
Stanford, Derek. Review of Leaflets. Books and Bookmen 17 (June 1972):86.
Van Duyn, Mona. “Seven Women.” Poetry 115 (March 1970): 430-29.

The Will to Change (1971)

Brownjohn, Alan. “Forebodings.” New Statesman, March 16, 1973, p. 384.
Cotter, James Finn. “Women Poets: Malign Neglect?” America, February 17, 1973, pp. 140-42.
“Fundamentals and Beyond.” Times Literary Supplement, April 20, 1973, p. 442.
Howard, Richard. Review of The Will to Change. Partisan Review 38 (Winter 1971-72):484. Reprinted in Alone with America.
See full citation for reprint in Articles in Books section.
Kalstone, David. Review of The Will to Change. New York Times Book Review, May 23, 1971, pp. 31-32.
Knox, Sandra. “Cane Wins Poetry Society Medal.” New York Times, April 24, p. 27.
Announcement of Rich’s receipt of the Shelly Memorial Award of the Poetry Society of America.
Knudson, Rozanne. Review of The Will to Change. Library Journal 96 (August 1971): 2515.
Lattimore, Richard. “Poetry Chronicle.” Hudson Review 24 (Autumn 1971): 499-510.
Murray, Michelle. “The Poetic Order Changeth.” National Observer, May 31, 1971, p. 19.
Oates, Joyce Carol. “Evolution.” Modern Poetry Studies 2 (1971):190.
Review of The Will to Change. Booklist 68 (October 1, 1971):129.
Review of The Will to Change. Choice 8 (December 1971):1330.
Review of The Will to Change. Kirkus Reviews 39 (March 1, 1971):277.
“Selection of Recent Titles.” New York Times Book Review, June 6, 1971, p. 37.
Four line announcement of The Will to Change.
Whitehead, James. Review of The Will to Change. Saturday Review, December 18, 1971, p. 37.

Diving into the Wreck (1973)

Alderson, Sue. Review of Diving into the Wreck. West Coast Review 10 (October 1975): 145-47.
Atwood, Margaret. Review of Diving into the Wreck. New York Times Book Review, December 30, 1973, pp. 1-2.
Bowering, Marilyn. Review of Diving into the Wreck. Malahat Review (Victoria, British Columbia), 33 (January 1975): 129-30.
Cotter, James Finn. Review of Diving into the Wreck. America, February 2, 1974, p. 78.
“Eclectic Reading.” New York Times, April 20, 1974, p. 30.
Rich’s receipt of the National Book Award for Diving into the Wreck is mentioned in editorial.
Fraser, Kathleen. “Songs of Experience.” Washington Post Book World, December 23, 1973, p. 2.
Flynn, Gale. “The Radicalization of Adrienne Rich.” See Articles in Serials section.
Howard, Richard. “Underground Streams.” Harper’s, December 1973, pp. 120-21.
For reprint information and annotation, see Articles in Books section.
Jong, Erica. “Visionary Anger.” Ms. 2 (July 1973)30-34. Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry, edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. W. W. Norton, 1975, pp. 171-74.
Pastan, Linda. Review of Diving into the Wreck. Library Journal 98 (May 15, 1973):1588.
Perloff, Marjorie G. “The Corn-Porn Lyric: Poetry 1972-1973.” Contemporary Literature 16 (Winter 1975):84- 125.
Prescott, Peter S. “Looking for Life.” Newsweek, December 24, 1973, p. 84.
Pritchard, William H. “Poetry Matters.” Hudson Review 26 (Fall 1973):585-88.
“Pynchon, Singer Share Fiction Prize.” New York Times, April 17, 1974, p. 37.
Brief announcement of Rich’s receipt of the National Book Award.
Review of Diving into the Wreck. Choice 10 (October 1973):1198.
Review of Diving into the Wreck. Publishers Weekly 203 (April 16, 1973):51.
Review of Diving into the Wreck. Virginia Quarterly Book Review 49 (Fall 1973):140.
Review of Diving into the Wreck. Washington Post Book World, May 20, 1973, p. 15.
Brief announcement of Diving into the Wreck.
Robinson, James K. “Sailing Close—Hauled and Diving into the Wreck: From Nemerov to Rich.” Southern Review 11 (Summer 1975):668-80.
Savery, Pancho. “Confrontations with the Self.” Epoch (Ithaca, New York), 23 (Autumn 1973):120-2q.
Schulman, Grace. Review of Diving into the Wreck. American Poetry Review 2 (September/October 1973):11.
Shapiro, Harvey. “Two Sisters in Poetry.” New York Times, August 25, 1973, p. 21.
Smith, Raymond. “With a Gift for Burning.” Modern Poetry Studies 5 (Spring 1974):84.
Stimpson, Catharine R. Review of Diving into the Wreck. Southern Humanities Review 10 (Winter 1976):81-84.
Sukenick, Lynn. Review of Diving into the Wreck. Village Voice, April 25, 1974, p. 23.
Tonks, Rosemary. “Cutting the Marble.” New York Review of Books, October 4, 1973, pp. 8-10.*
Vendler, Helen. “‘Ghostlier Demarcations, Keener Sounds.’” Parnassus: Poetry in Review 2 (Fall-Winter 1973):5. Reprinted in Adrienne: Poetry in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry, edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. New York: W. W. Norton, 1975, pp. 160-79; also in Helen Vendler, Part of Nature, Part of Us: Modern American Poets. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1980, pp. 237-62.
Walker, Cheryl. “‘Trying to Save the Skein.'” The Nation, October 8, 1973, pp. 346-49.*
Weisman, Steven R. “World of Books Presents Its Oscars.” New York Times, April 19, 1974, p. 24. Short announcement of Rich’s National Book Award for Diving into the Wreck.

Poems: Selected and New (1975)

Bell, Pearl K. “Poets of Our Times.” New Leader, May 26, 1975, pp. 3-5.
Brown, Rosellen. “‘The Notes for the Poem Are the Only Poem.'” Parnassus: Poetry in Review 4 (Fall/Winter 1975):50-67.
Clemons, Walter. “Adrienne Rich: A Retrospective.” New York Times Book Review, April 27, 1975, p. 5.
Cotter, James Finn. Review of Poems: Selected and New. America, January 31, 1976, pp. 80-81.
Dahlen, Beverly. “The Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” Review of Poems: Selected and New; Adrienne Rich’s Poetry: A Norton Critical Edition; and Twenty-One Love Poems. San Francisco Review of Books 2 (September 1976):19-21.
Fraser, G. S. “Free and Uneasy.” Partisan Review 45 (1978):151-53.
Goldstein, Laurence. “The Evolution of Adrienne Rich.” Michigan Quarterly Review 15 (Summer 1976):360-66.
Hartsell, Elinor Emmons. “No Quiet Place.” Southern Review 12 (April 1976):422-25.
Henninger, Mary Nugent. “A Female Trio: Gender Means Little.” National Observer, June 21, 1975, p. 21.
Mclellan, Joseph. “Briefly Noted: Poems: Selected and New.” Washington Post Book World, May 18, 1075, p. 4.
Morris, John N. “‘The Songs Protect Us, in a Way.'” Review of Poems: Selected and New and Adrienne Rich’s Poetry: A Norton Critical Edition. Hudson Review 28 (Autumn 1975):446-5.
“1975 A Selection of Noteworthy Titles.” New York Times Book Review, December 7, 1975, pp. 70-72. Four-line announcement of Poems: Selected and New.
Pastan, Linda. Review of Poems: Selected and New. Library Journal 100 (February 15, 1975):397.
Poss, Stanley. “‘Such Women Are Dangerous / to the Order of Things.'” Western Humanities Review 29 (Autumn 1975):388-91.
Pritchard, William H. “Despairing at Styles.” Poetry 127 (February 1976):297-302.
Review of Poems: Selected and New. Booklist 75 (July 15, 1975):1159.
Review of Poems: Selected and New. Choice 12 (July 1975):684.
Review of Poems: Selected and New. Kirkus Reviews 43 (February 1, 1975):168.
Review of Poems: Selected and New. Publishers Weekly 207 (February 3, 1975):74.
“Selected Vacation Reading List.” New York Times Book Review, June 1, 1975, p. 29.
Four line announcement of Poems: Selected and New.
Spiegelman, Willard. “Voice of the Survivor: The Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” Southwest Review 6 (Autumn 1975):370-88.
Wells, Denzil. “A Fine Nine.” Village Voice, December 15, 1975, p. 73.
Whitman, Ruth. “Three Women Poets.” Harvard Magazine, July/August 1975, pp. 66-67.*
Wilner, Eleanor. ” ‘This Accurate Dreamer’: An Appreciation of Poems: Selected and New.” American Poetry Review 4 (March/April 1975): 4-7.

Of Woman Born (1976)

Barry, Kathleen. “Reviewing Reviews—Of Woman Born.” See Articles in Serials section.
Baruch, Elaine Hoffman. “Of Mothers and Fathers.” Dissent 25 (Winter 1078):98-102.
Casari, L. E. Review of Of Woman Born. Prairie Schooner 52 (Summer 1978):206-7.
Christ, Carol P. “Motherhood: Spirit and Flesh.” Cross Currents 28 (Summer 1978): 244-47.
Cook, Catherine. “The Back of the Hand That Rocks the Cradle.” National Observer, November 13, 1976, p. 23.
Crutcher, Anne. “Motherhood—An Unmixed Blessing.” Washington Star, October 17, 1976, p. F4. See Shanahan entry below, for citation of Letter to the Editor in response to Crutcher’s review.
Daly, Mary. “Our Mothers, Our Daughters.” The Real Paper, December 4, 1976, p. 6.
Gardiner, Judith Kegan. “The New Motherhood.” North American Review 263 (Fall 1978):72-76.
Gargan, C. Review of Of Woman Born. Best Sellers 36 (February 1977)354.
Glazer, Nona. Review of Of Woman Born. Contemporary Sociology 6 (July 1977):480-82.
Gottlieb, Annie. “On Reading: Feminists Look at Motherhood.” Mother Jones, November 1976, pp. 51-53.
Gray, Francine Du Plessix. “Amazonian Prescriptions and Proscriptions.” New York Times Book Review, October 10, 1976, p. 3.
Hall, Joan Joffe. Review of Of Woman Born. New Republic, November 6, 1976, pp. 28-30.
Hirsch, Marianne. “Review Essay: Mothers and Daughters.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 7 (Autumn 1981):200-222.
Jacob, John. Review of Of Woman Born. Booklist 73 (November 15, 1976): 436-37.
Janeway, Elizabeth. Review of Of Woman Born, Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture, no. 7 (1977): 132-35.
See also Dorothy Bryant, “A Reader’s Response to the Review of Of Woman Born.” Letter to the Editor. Chrysalis, no. 3 (Spring 1978): 6; and Janeway, “Author’s Reply” in same issue, p. 6; also, Elly Bulkin, “Homophobia in Chrysalis?!” Letter to the Editor. Chrysalis, no. 4 (Summer 1978): 6; and Janeway, “To Each Her Own,” in same issue, p. 6.
Larkin, Joan. “Theory.” Sinister Wisdom 1 (Fall 1976): 89-91.
Lazarre, Jane. “Adrienne Rich Comes to Terms with ‘the Woman in the Mirror.’” Village Voice, November 8, 1976, pp. 81-82.
Lerner, Gerda. “Motherhood in Historical Perspective. ” Journal of Family History 3 (Fall 1978):297-301.
Maraini, Dacia. “Viewpoint.” Translated by Mary Jane Ciccarello. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 4 (Summer 1979): 687-94.
McPherson, Elizabeth. “On Becoming Pregnant.” America, February 26, 1977, pp. 172-73.
Mednick, Martha S. Review of Of Woman Born. Contemporary Psychology 22 (July 1977): 535-36.
Mitchell, Sally. Review of Of Woman Born in Library Journal 101 (October 15, 1976): 2189.
Newton, Niles. Review of Of Woman Born in Psychology Today, January 1977, pp. 88-90.
O’Connell, Mary. “Rich’s Bleak Portrait of Motherhood.” Panorama—Chicago Daily News, October 16-17, 1976.
Prescott, Peter S. “A Woman’s Lot.” Newsweek, October 18, 1976, p. 106.
Review of Of Woman Born. Choice 13 (January 1977):1504.
Review of Of Woman Born. Kirkus Reviews 44 (August 23, 1976):954-55.
Review of Of Woman Born. Publishers Weekly 210 (August 23, 1976):64.
Review of Of Woman Born. Washington Post Book World, December 5, 1976, p. H9.
Short announcement of publication.
Rothman, Barbara Katz. Review of Of Woman Born. Journal of Marriage and the Family 40 (May 1978): 438-41.
Rudikofe Sonya. “Motherhood and the Many Myths of Men.” Washington Post Book World, November 14, 1976, pp. L1-2.
Shanahan, Thomazine. “Error of Omission: Response to Anne Crutcher. ” Letter to the Editor. Washington Star, November 7, 1976, p. G3. See Crutcher entry, above.
Stone, Elizabeth. “Those Love-Hate Relationships Between Mothers and Daughters.” Weight Watchers, August 1976, p. 40.
Theroux, Alexander. “Reading the Poverty of Rich.” Boston Magazine, November 1976, pp. 46-47.
Tweedie, Jill. “Alone Together.” Saturday Review, November 13, 1976, pp. 28-31.
Vendler, Helen. “Myths for Mothers.” New York Review of Books, September 30, 1976, pp. 16-18. (Reprinted in Vendler, Part of Nature, Part of Us: Modern American Poets. Harvard University Press, 1980.)
Waelti-Walters, Jennifer. Review of Of Woman Born. Malahat Review (Victoria, British Columbia), no. 42 (April 1977): 136-37.
Wrightsman, Lawrence S. Review of Of Woman Born. Contemporary Psychology 23 (September 1978): 663.

Twenty-One Love Poems (1976)

Dahlen, Beverly. “The Poetry of Adrienne Rich.” Review of Poems: Selected and New; Adrienne Rich’s Poetry: A Norton Critical Edition; and Twenty-One Love Poems. San Francisco Review of Books 2 (September 1976): 19-21.
Shore, Rima. “‘To Move Openly Together / In the Pull of Gravity.’” Conditions: One, no. 1 (April 1977):113-18.

The Meaning of Our Love for Women Is What We Have Constantly To Expand (1977)

Zimmerman, Bonnie. Review of The Meaning of Our Love for Women is
What We Have Constantly To Expand. Conditions: Six 2 (Summer 1980):232- 37.

The Dream of a Common Language (1978)

Atwood, Margaret. “Unfinished Women.” New York Times Book Review, June 11, 1978, p. 7.
Broumas, Olga. Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture, no. 6 (1978):109-13.
Carruth, Hayden. “Excellence in Poetry.” Harper’s, November 1978, pp.81-88.
“A Year’s Poetry.” The Nation, December 23, 1978, p. 712.
Estrin, Barbara L. “Rich Woman, Poor Man: The Dream of a Common Language.” Salmagundi, no. 44–45 (Spring-Summer 1979): 224-34.
Hall, Donald. “Everything That Grows.” The Nation, July 1, 1978, pp. 21-22.
Hughes, Mary Gray. “Summer Becomes a Poet.” VISION (Dallas), April 1979, pp. 8-9.
Jacob, John. Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Booklist 74 (July 1, 1978): 1659.
Johnson, Alia. “Communications.” Co-Evolution Quarterly, no. 25 (Spring 1980): 122.
McDaniel, Judith. “To Be of Use: Politics and Vision in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry.” Sinister Wisdom, no. 7 (Fall 1978): 92-99.
Muske, Carol. “Backward into the Future.” Parnassus: Poetry in Review 7 (Fall/Winter 1979):77-90.
Oates, Joyce Carol. “Joyce Carol Oates on Poetry.” New Republic, December 9, 1978, pp. 25-30.
Ostriker, Alicia. “Her Cargo: Adrienne Rich and the Common Language.” American Poetry Review 8 (July/August 1979): 6-10.
Pastan, Linda. Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Library Journal 103 (March 1, 1978): 569.
Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Choice 15 (November 1978): 1219-20.
Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Kirkus Reviews 46 (February 1, 1978): 169.
Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Publishers Weekly 213 (February 20, 1978): 112.
Ward, Andrew. “Short Review.” Atlantic, June 1978, p. 100.
Webster, Harvey Curtis. “Six Poets.” Poetry 133 (January 1979): 227-34.
Whitehill, Karen. “A Whole New Poetry.” Virginia Quarterly Review 55 (Summer 1979): 563-67.
Wood-Thompson, Susan. Review of The Dream of a Common Language. Feminary 10 (Autumn 1979): 68-79.
Yenser, Stephen. “New Books in Review.” Yale Review 68 (Fall 1978): 83- 102.
Young, Vernon. “Poetry Chronicle: First, Second, and Third Person- Singular.” Hudson Review 31 (Winter 1978-79): 677-92.

On Lies, Secrets and Silence: Selected Prose, 1966-1978. (1979)

Butscher, Edward. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Booklist 75 (June 1, 1979):1474-75.
Eaglen, Audrey B. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Library Journal 104 (June 1, 1979): 1258-59.
Gargan, C. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Best Sellers 39 (August 1979): 191.
Harrison, Barbara Grizzuti. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. New Republic, June 2, 1979, pp. 37-39. (For reprint information and annotation, see Articles in Books section.)
Moers, Ellen. “A Poet’s Feminist Prose.” New York Times Book Review, April 22, 1979, p. 12.*
O’Connell, Mary. “Richly Oppressive.” Chicago Sun-Times, April 15, 1979.
Rainone, Francine. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies 5 (Spring 1980): 75-76.
Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Choice 16 (September 1979):836.
Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Kirkus Reviews 47 (March 15, 1979): 376.
Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. New York Times Book Review, December 30, 1979, p. 23.
Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Publishers Weekly 215 (February 19, 1979):98.
Russ, Joanna. “Forsaking the Opposite Sex.” Washington Post Book World, May 6, 1979, p. F6.
Snitow, Ann Barr. Review of On Lies, Secrets and Silence. Harvard Educational Review 49 (November 1979):546-49.

A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far (1981)

Grosholz, Emily. “Poetry Chronicle.” Hudson Review 35 (Summer 1982): 324-25.
Juhasz, Suzanne. Review of A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far. Library Journal 106 (October 15, 198l): 2033.
Kilgore, Kathryn. “Rituals of Self-Hatred, Arts of Survival.” Village Voice Literary Supplement, December 1981, p. 20.
Mandelbaum, Sara. “New Poetry: Adrienne Rich’s Wild Patience.” Ms. 10 (December 1981):21-22.
Milford, Nancy. “Messages From No Man’s Land.” New York Times Book Review, December 20, 1981, p. 7.
“Notes on Current Books.” Virginia Quarterly Review 58 (Spring 1982):58-59.
Parini, Jay. “Selves and Others.” Times Literary Supplement, November 12, 1982, p. 1251.
Review of A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far. Booklist 78 (November 15, 1982): 423.
Review of A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far. Publishers Weekly 220 (October 2, 1981): 110.
Vendler, Helen. “All Too Real.” New York Review of Books, December 17, 1981, pp. 32-35.
Wood-Thompson, Susan. Review of A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far. Little Lamos Review 2 (February 1982): 2-4.

Your Native Land, Your Life (1986)

Time’s Power (1989)

“From the Back Row.” The Progressive 54 (April 1990): 43.

Atlas of the Difficult World (1991)

Hussman, Mary. “On Adrienne Rich.” Iowa Review 22, No. 1 (Winter 1992): 221-25.

Collected Early Poems (1992)

Bromwich, David. Review of Collected Early Poems, 1950-1970. New Republic, November 8, 1993, 22-27.

What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics  (1993, 2001)
Dark Fields of the Republic: Poems 1991-1995  (1995)

Allen, Doree. “Voicing the Unspoken: A Reading of Dark Fields of the Republic.”  Women’s Studies 27 (Spring 1998): 389-96.

Midnight Salvage: Poems 1995-1998  (1999)

Arts of the Possible: Essays and Conversations  (2001)

Fox: Poems 1998-2000
  (2001)

Brogan, Jacqueline Vaught. “Loving the World She Hates? Hating the World She Loves.” Review of Fox: Poems, 1998-2000. Poetry International 6 (2002): 244-78.
Oktenberg, Adrian. “Incandescent Clarity,” review of Volcano Sequence by Alicia Suski Ostriker, and Fox: Poems, 1998-2000. Women’s Review of Books 19, No. 10-11 (July 2002): 35-36.

The School Among the Ruins: Poems 2000-2004  (2004)

Erickson, Peter. Review of The School Among the Ruins. Women’s Studies 34 (2005): 99-102.
Yeh, Jane. “Undercover Prying.” Poetry Review 95, no. 1 (2005): 71-72.
Telephone Ringing in the Labyrinth: Poems 2004-2006  (2007)
Poetry & Commitment: An Essay  (2007)
A Human Eye: Essays on Art and Society, 1997-2008  (2009)
Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems 2007-2010  (2011)
Later Poems: Selected and New: 1971-2012  (2012)
Collected Poems 1951-2012  (2016)

Interviews

Shaw, Robert and Plotz, John. “An Interview with Adrienne Rich.” The Island 1 (May 1966): 2-8.
Plumly, Stanley; Dodd, Wayne; and Tevis, Walter. “Talking with Adrienne Rich.” Ohio Review 13 (1971): 29-46.
Kalstone, David. “Talking with Adrienne Rich.” Saturday Review: The Arts, April 22, 1972, pp. 56-59.
Abramson, Neal and Wainer, Nora Roberts. “Interview: Talking with Adrienne Rich.” CITY Magazine (City College of New York) No.3 (Winter 1974-75): 52-56.
Gelpi, Barbara Charlesworth; Gelpi, Albert; and Rich, Adrienne. “Three Conversations.” In Adrienne Rich’s Poetry (NCE), edited by Gelpi and Gelpi, W.W. Norton, 1975, pp. 105-22.
Grimstad, Kirsten and Rennie, Susan. “Adrienne Rich and Robin Morgan Talk About Poetry and Women’s Culture.” In The New Women’s Survival Sourcebook, edited by Grimstad and Rennie, pp. 106-111. Alfred A. Knopf, 1975.
Boyd, Blanche M. “Interview: Adrienne Rich. ” Christopher Street, January 1977, pp. 9-16.
Bulkin, Elly. “An Interview with Adrienne Rich.” Conditions: One (April 1977):58-60; Conditions: Two (October 1977):53-66.
Miner, Valerie. “An Interview with Adrienne Rich and Mary Daly.” San Francisco Review of Books 3 (October 1977):8-14.
Lorde, Audre and Rich, Adrienne. “An Interview with Audre Lorde.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 6 (Summer 1981):713-36.
Lorde, Audre and Rich, Adrienne. “Interview with Audre Lorde.” In Woman Poet—The East, edited by Elaine Dallman. Reno, Nevada: Women-in-Literature, 1981, pp. 18-21.
Montenegro, David. “An Interview with Adrienne Rich.” American Poetry Review 20.1 (January-February 1991); 7-14. Reprinted in Adrienne Rich’s Poetry & Prose, revised ed. (1993).
Trinidad, David. “Adrienne Rich Charts a Difficult World: The Acclaimed Poet Talks of Art, Anger, and Activism.” The Advocate, December 31, 1991, 82-84.
Kirkpatrick, Patricia. “Look Around at All of It: An Interview with Adrienne Rich.” Hungry Mind Review (Spring 1992): 56-59.
McQuade, Molly. Publisher’s Weekly, November 19, 1993, 44-45. Reprinted in Stealing Glimpses: Of Poetry, Poets, and Things In Between. Louisville, Ky: Sarabande Books, 1999.
Moyers, Bill. “Interview with Adrienne Rich” in The Language of Life: a Festival of Poets, edited by James Haba, pp. 335-53. Doubleday, 1995.
Rothschild, Matthew. “I happen to think that poetry makes a huge difference: an Interview with Adrienne Rich.” The Progressive (January 1994): pp.31-35.
Waldman, Kate. Adrienne Rich on Tonight No Poetry Will Serve.Paris Review, March 2, 2011.